Academic Job Cover Letter Engineering Internship

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Engineering Intern Cover Letter

Engineering Interns are entry-level employees, often students, who assist engineering teams to gain hands-on experience in their profession. Essential job duties of an Engineering Intern are helping to develop hardware, running tests, ensuring system safety, assisting with launch operations, completing data analysis, completing tasks as assigned by engineers, taking corrective action in case of non-compliance, following work instructions, liaising with suppliers, and observing engineering operations.

A successful cover letter sample for Engineering Intern should focus on skills and qualifications like:

  • Engineering expertise
  • Being able to follow verbal and written instructions
  • An interest in learning new things
  • Knowledge of safety standards
  • Computer competences
  • Teamwork
  • Availability for work in shifts
  • A good academic record
  • Attention to details and accuracy
  • Effective communication

Below is displayed a cover letter sample for Engineering Intern demonstrating similar abilities and qualities.

For help with your resume, check out our extensive Engineering Intern Resume Samples.

Dear Ms. Herrera:

I am sending you the enclosed resume in response to learning of your search for an Engineering Intern. With my avid interest and ongoing education in civil engineering, as well as my skills in team collaboration and project support, I feel confident that I would significantly benefit your organization in this capacity.

My hands-on practicum experience coupled with the growing knowledge base I am amassing during my education at Wyoming State University prepares me to make a solid contribution in an internship position. With a solid foundation in the basics of civil engineering—including urban and regional studies and strategic planning—I am more than prepared to put my knowledge and abilities to work for you, while also gaining immeasurable experience and transferable skills to enable me to advance in my career pursuits. Furthermore, my organizational, communication, and leadership abilities position me ready to thrive in this challenging field.

Highlights of my background include…

  • Preparing to achieve a BS degree in Civil Engineering from Wyoming State University, performing in-depth research, designing engineering project plans and strategies, writing detailed reports, and delivering formal presentations—all while demonstrating a consistently superior academic record.
  • Completing an internship with the City of Jackson Hole, studying, dismantling, and ultimately working to improve KVA diesel generators within city buildings.
  • Observing and analyzing staff throughout my internship to learn more about the time and motion requirements of job responsibilities.
  • Participating in team-oriented projects and leading peers to project success while also excelling within more independent roles.
  • Demonstrating a keen willingness to learn, an adaptable and flexible work ethic, the ability to accurately follow instructions, and a sharp technical aptitude.

With my previous excellent academic-based and internship experience, coupled with my enthusiasm and dedication to achieving success, I believe I could swiftly exceed your expectations as your next Engineering Intern. I look forward to discussing this opportunity in detail. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Kenneth W. Mullins

A cover letter is an important tool to use when applying for a job because it:

  • Introduces you to the prospective employer
  • Highlights your enthusiasm for the position
  • Describes your specific skills and qualifications for the job or internship, and clearly explains why you are a good fit
  • Confirms your availability to start a new position

You should always include a cover letter when applying for a job unless you are specifically told not to by the employer. We recommend that you write a cover letter (aka letter of intent) after you have drafted and tailored your resume or curriculum vitae (CV) for a particular job description. For academic faculty and teaching positions, see cover letter instructions in Masters, Ph.D.'s and Postdocs section. When applying online and limited to uploading one document, you can create a single PDF document that includes both your resume and cover letter.

What to Include in a Cover Letter

Use the cover letter template and planner to get started. When drafting your cover letter, keep the following DO’s and DON’Ts in mind:

Do's

  • Limit the cover letter to one page if possible, unless applying to academic faculty, teaching or research positions.
  • Use the same font and formatting in the cover letter as you use in your resume.
  • You might also want to use the same header in both a cover letter and resume. See header formatting examples.
  • If providing a printed copy, use the same type of paper for both your cover letter and resume. Resume paper can be purchased at the UC Davis Bookstore or at an office supply store.
  • Many tech companies prefer the cover letter not be attached, but uploaded as text in an email with the resume attached.
  • Use formal, professional language in a cover letter. This is true when sending your cover letter as text in an email (above point).
  • Personalize each cover letter to the specific position you are applying to.
  • Address your cover letter to a specific person or the hiring manager whenever possible. If you don’t know their name, use one of the following examples:
    • "Dear Hiring Manager,"
    • "Dear [insert department here] Hiring Team,"
    • "Dear Recruiter, "
    • “Dear Search Committee Chair and Committee Members:” (used for academic teaching positions)
    • "To Whom It May Concern: " Note, this last one uses a “:” not a “,”
  • Check for typos, proper grammar and accuracy.
  • Use spellcheck, but do not rely on it to catch all errors.
  • Have multiple people review your application materials.
  • Make an appointment with an ICC adviser to review your application materials before you apply.

Don'ts

  • Unless told explicitly not to, you should always include a cover letter in your application.
  • Don’t use text abbreviations or emoticons if you are using email.
  • Don’t be too wordy or write just to fill the entire page.
  • Don’t submit a generic “one size fits all” cover letter; tailor your cover letter to fit each position. Thus, none of your cover letters will be exactly the same, though a lot of content will be similar in each.
  • Don’t repeat or summarize your resume in your cover letter. Instead, focus the cover letter on your enthusiasm for the job, excitement about working with that organization, to highlight unique skills that make you qualified for the position and a good fit for the employer.
  • Don’t overuse adjectives or superlatives, especially subjective ones (e.g. “You are the best company in the world” or “I am the most hardworking student intern you will ever meet.”).
  • Quantify when possible. "I've helped organize three club events, including two successful initiatives attended by 25 people" is a better descriptor then "I've helped organize several club events, including a couple successful initiatives attended by many people."
  • Don’t exaggerate your skills or experience.
  • Don’t use UC Davis letterhead, logo, or UC seal in your cover letter. [NOTE: For graduate students and postdocs, some departments allow use of department letterhead for tenure-track faculty applications. Check with your department before using.]

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